Fully enjoy daffodils and gourmet food on the island! A daffodil walk and fish market event (Oidemaase Ogi)

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  • Fully enjoy daffodils and gourmet food on the island! A daffodil walk and fish market event (Oidemaase Ogi)

Ogijima Island, which it takes 40 minutes to visit by ferry from Takamatsu Port, attracts tourists from outside the island who enjoy hiking even in winter. They come to enjoy the blooming daffodils.


Ogijima Island

Oidemaase Ogi: Suisen Walk to Kaisen Ichiba, a daffodil walk and fish market event, is held to let visitors enjoy winter on Ogijima Island during the best time for viewing daffodils. This annual event is held from late January to late February along with the blossoming daffodils. Visitors can enjoy these flowers, which signal the arrival of spring, and gourmet dishes that use local ingredients. In 2018, this event attracted more than 200 people, partly because the inside of Ogijima Lighthouse was open to the public for a limited time.


ferry"Meon"

Participants in the event can use Meon, a special chartered ferry, instead of Meon 2, the regular ferry between Takamatsu and Ogijima Island. The ferry, including its deck, was filled with passengers. Meon sails directly to Ogijima Island, unlike the regular ferry, which makes a stop at Megijima Island.


Meon sails directly to Ogijima Island.

People from the island welcomed us immediately when we arrived.


People from the island welcomed us immediately

We walked for 30 minutes to Ogijima Lighthouse, where the daffodil colony is located. Going through the sloping settlement, I discovered an open field with a flat road leading to the lighthouse.


Walk to Ogijima Lighthouse

Trees along the road also signal spring's arrival


Trees along the road also signal spring's arrival in Ogijima

I kept walking towards the lighthouse, encouraged by hand-written signs showing the distance to the destination, here and there along the road.


hand-written signs showing the distance to the destination

I arrived at the lighthouse to find people queuing to see inside, which was open to the public for a limited time.


Ogijima Lighthouse

The capacity of the compact lighthouse is about six people. I walked up the spiral staircase made of granite.


The spiral staircase in Ogijima Lighthouse

From the lighthouse, the Seto Inland Sea was dotted with ships of various sizes, ranging from fishing boats to large tankers. Approx. 500 ships sail in the sea every day. The Seto Inland Sea is ranked 2nd in Japan in terms of sea traffic volume.


Ogijima Lighthouse and the Seto Inland Sea

Designated as one of the "50 Lighthouses of Japan," Ogijima Lighthouse is made of granite from Aji, Takamatsu City. It is one of the only two unpainted lighthouses in Japan. Constructed in 1895, it is still used to watch ships sailing off the island.


The Seto Inland Sea from Ogijima lighthouse

The museum built on the lighthouse property has exhibits about the history of Ogijima Lighthouse, which was also used as a movie filming location.


The museum built on the lighthouse property has exhibits about the history of Ogijima Lighthouse

A large number of white daffodils were blooming on the slope, as if trying to surround the nearby walking trail.


A large number of white daffodils were blooming on the slope, as if trying to surround the nearby walking trail.
11 million daffodils bloom on Ogijima island

Bulbs of daffodils began to be planted around 2004, mainly near the walking trail. Currently, 11 million daffodils bloom on the island.


The daffodil colony is filled with salty air and the sweet scent of daffodils
11 million daffodils bloom in Ogijima island

The daffodil colony is filled with salty air and the sweet scent of daffodils. With the flowers facing the sun, daffodils signal the arrival of spring.

After the fully enjoyable daffodil walk was the much-awaited time for gourmet foods from the island. In the bustling seafood market with an array of local ingredients, I received a bento that was specifically prepared for the event.


seafood market in Ogijima island

All of the ingredients used for this bento are local seasonal foods. It is a premium lunch only available to tour participants on that day.


Special bento offered as Ogijima island style

▲Special bento offered in 2018

Daggertooth pike conger, wakame seaweed stems (kukiwakame), olive-fed yellowtail (olive hamachi) and lemon, plus local specialty octopus, broad beans and daikon radish

Fish scrap soup (ara-jiru) with boar meat slowly warms your cold body.


All of the ingredients used for this bento are local seasonal foods. It is a premium lunch only available to tour participants on that day

From the flavorful food to the carefully written menu, I felt the time and energy devoted to preparing the lunch and hospitality of people from the island.

An appetizing smell also came from the seafood market. It seemed that I still had a lot more local gourmet seafood to see on the island.


Grilled turban shell

Grilled turban shell


Hot stewed iidako octopus with a tough texture

Hot stewed iidako octopus with a tough texture


Fluffy akashiyaki dumplings with soup stock

Fluffy akashiyaki dumplings with soup stock

Gourmet seafood tastes much better in the port market than in a restaurant.


enjoyable to chat with fishermen

It is also enjoyable to chat with fishermen or people from the island.


daffodils from Ogijima island are available as souvenirs

Daffodils from the island are also available as souvenirs.

The daffodil colony, where the sweet scent blends with the salty wind, the lighthouse that has continued to watch over this sea for more than 120 years, local specialty foods and a boxed lunch prepared with hospitality -- I took photos of the island's landscape that I could only encounter on that day, tasted local foods and got on the return ferry with some reluctance to leave the island.

When the ferry began to move, I heard a chorus of voices of the people at the port.


Many people bid farewell to the ferry

"Thank you!" "Come back to the island again!"


"Thank you!" "Come back to Ogijima island again!"

Many people, including those waving their hands and others waving a flag, bid farewell to the ferry.

"I'll come back again!"


Ogijima Island "I'll come back again!"

I was reluctant to leave Ogijima Island, a remote island off the coast of Takamatsu.

The island awaiting spring was a warm, delicious place.


INFORMATION

Ogijima

Gathering date:2018.4.9 / Ogijima

KEYWORDS

PHOTOGRAPHERPHOTOGRAPHER

Yu Sakaguchimore

Yu Sakaguchi is a photographer who photographs the beautiful scenery of the 138 habited islands in the Seto Inland Sea, agricultural, mountain and fishing villages in Shikoku. He makes his living in design work relating to primary industry. His website Monogatari o Todokeru Shigoto (“The Job of Delivering Stories”) introduces the beautiful scenery, culinary culture and various other aspects of Shikoku and the islands of the Seto Inland Sea, and has been accessed by users in over 160 different countries. Feeling that it would be difficult to preserve the scenery in front of him for the next generation by simply distributing information alone, together with his fellow Shikoku-loving companions, he launched Shikoku Taberu (Food) Tsushin magazine, and began his work communicating the food culture and stories of the region. He is a director for the Sanagouchi Village foundation. He was awarded the Japan Ningenryoku (“Human Skill”) Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Award in 2015.

https://yousakana.jp/

PHOTOGRAPHERPHOTOGRAPHER

Masaki Minagawa(NOCOS)more

Masaki Minagawa was born in Osaka in 1985. After graduating from the Japan Institute of Photography and Film, he started work at Nice! Ltd., where he learned mainly bridal and other human photography; before becoming independent and establishing Nocos photography in 2015. His current activities focus primarily on family, bridal and commemorative photographs. He also shoots photographs for corporate homepages, advertisements and architectural work.

WRITER WRITER

Eri Kotakimore

Eri Kotaki was born in Takamatsu, in Kagawa prefecture. After studying fashion, color and graphic design at university, she developed a love of travel, local gourmet cuisine and photography; and became an editor/writer. After working in various positions in editorial production and publishing companies in Tokyo, she joined the Takamatsu City Regional Promotion Cooperative Group in July 2017. She now spends her days uncovering and communicating information about the appeal and attraction of Takamatsu and its surrounding areas. Her top recommended location is the night view from Sunport Takamatsu. Her most recommended train is the Hiyaku, which runs on the Takamatsu-Kotohira Electric Railroad.

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